Relationships and the Challenges of Worry

April 19, 2014
By

Franky 242 Conflict FDPWithin the library of Dale Carnegie’s classic bestsellers, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living is a powerful advice guide that is a wonderful partner book with How to Win Friends and Influence People. First copyrighted during World War II, the topic of managing worry is assessed through eight parts that focus on what we call in 2014 lingo, stress management. Through the use of real examples and stories that highlight strategies for relationship and engagement, the book continues to be an important guide for professionals who must deal with fundamental emotions and ideas within organizations. Because business exists through people, relationships drive values, teamwork and goals when they are managed well.

Our economy here in the Northwest is like the rest of the country. Employees are working longer hours and are surrounded by smaller staffs. This situation can increase both worry and stress in normal daily activities. The challenges for continuous success can create conflict, worry, and interpersonal dysfunction. Managing pressure in the workplace is an essential aspect of leadership.

Mr. Carnegie emphasizes the importance of building and maintaining positive relationships. Engagement is critical.

The Carnegie Principles offer key relational insight:

  • A genuine smile is always welcome and always received.
  • Eye contact makes the other person feel important and needed.
  • Nodding in agreement increases the engagement and discussion.
  • An open and relaxed posture is inviting to increasing dialogue.
  • Physically lean into the conversation to create a visible partnering.
  • Give undivided attention to the speaker at all times with your smartphone on vibrate.
  • Focusing on the positives of every issue discussed will increase productivity.

Worry and stress are manageable by focusing on the present knowing we cannot control what has happened in our past or what will happen in our future. In one important section of the book, Dale Carnegie talks about writing down some advice he saw in a doctor’s office.

Slightly edited for message; “The most relaxing forces are health, sleep, music, and laughter. Have faith. Learn to sleep well. Love good music. See the funny side of life. With these in hand, health and happiness will be yours.”

When employees and teams are focused on critical deadlines, remember the advice of a good doctor through the eyes of Dale Carnegie.

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This post is brought to you by the good folks at Dale Carnegie Training Northwest, providers of professional development and management development courses and information in the Northwest. We’d love to connect with you on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Photo: Franky 242, Freedigitalphotos.net

 

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